Bach

J.S. Bach: The Violin Concertos, Amsterdam Soloists with Emmy Verhey (Brilliant Classics, 2006)

“Composer: Johann Sebastian Bach Artists: Emmy Verhey (violin), Camerata Antonio Luco, Rainer Kussmaul (violin), Henk Rubingh (violin), Thomas Hengelbrock (violin), Amsterdam Bach (Soloists)

About this album: Available as a separate release: all concertos for 1 violin by Bach. They are BWV 1041 and 1042: the well-known concertos. BWV1052, 1056 and 1064 are reconstructions. The latter one being for three violins. Soloists are among others Emmy Verhey and Rainer Kussmaul.”

Information taken from the YouTube video

“Hop Special (Whiter Shade of Pale),” Roland Alphonso prod. Derrick Morgan, 7” (Pyramid, 1968) w/Alton Ellis, Pat Kelly & Lynn Taitt & The Jets plus more

“Roland’s flavor was one of the first tastes of the nation’s emerging musical identity. His saxophone sounds shaped Jamaican music at its “Boogie Shuffle” inception and into Ska, Rock Steady and Reggae.”

Brian Keyo, “Rolando Alphonso, 1931-1998 - A Remembrance of The Chief Musician, SoulVendors.com, 2003(?)

Embedded in this version of Procol Harum’s “A Whiter Shade of Pale” by the artist dubbed “The Chief Musician” of Jamaica, Roland Alphonso is the alchemy that so often defines essential recordings in any genre: the fusion of the individual artist’s spirit, with history, the expression of a clear voice that is enhanced by echoes of the past.

This performance, or interpretation remains open, expressing vulnerability where contrasts can co-exist. There is something both melancholy and stirring about this music, from the very opening moments, in its purposefully naive interpretation of the extremely famous song. My use of the word “naive” is not a criticism, but quite the reverse, as I have never liked the Procol Harum original – here is a video of a 1968 live performance - that was a massive hit (winning a Grammy, reaching first place on the UK charts, selling more than 10 million copies worldwide), but I love the Roland Alphonso version and some other reggae takes, also included here.

Some have said that the Procol Harum song is the most popular/best/greatest British song of all time, sharing the honour with Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody: two songs notable for their inclusion of the word “fandango” in their lyrics. The original may, or may not borrow from the second movement of Bach’s Orchestral Suite No. 3 in D Major, one of the group’s song-writers, Allan Moore has said that there is “a certain family resemblance” that “creates the sense of [Bach’s] music but no direct quotation. (The music also borrows ideas from "When a Man Loves a Woman" by Percy Sledge, apparently).

Here is a truly beautiful performance of the Bach piece by the Mito Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Seiji Ozawa from 1990. I realise that the video might be a bit distracting, to get a sense of the wonder of the performance it might be best to listen to the music without it. Notice how the musicians allow the music to stay still at certain moments, allowing the music to rest before returning to the fold.

Bach: 'Erbarme dich' St Matthew Passion - Andreas Scholl (and 'Ruht Wohl ihr heiligen Gebeine' St John Passion)

The subtly rhythmic “Erbarme Dich” is as meditative as “Ruht Wohl” but far more melancholy. It is no lullaby. And yet how could anything be sadder than mourning the dead? 

(...) The secret of the aria lies not in its melody but its rhythm. The time signature is 12/8, which is that of most slow blues ... Bach has 12 beats to play with per measure, each one worth an 8th note (yep, that’s why it’s called 12/8). Like any good bluesman, he arranges them in runs of triplets. His runs go down the natural minor scale of B (recall that natural minor scale = scale of relative major, which here would be D). Hamari - the singer - sustains that B over 9 beats: GGG-F#F#F#-EEE. (By all means, go ahead and count the 3 triplets by tapping gently on your keyboard 9 times.) This is just like a jazz walking bass line. But instead of Charles Mingus, we’ve got cellists plucking the strings of their instruments to evoke the tears flowing down Peter’s cheeks. (We know that from the prior recitative and the fact that Bach was always big on sound imagery ....) The descending line is relentless. The walking bass goes down and down and down, then comes up for air only to resume its plunge.

Yehudi Menuhin was crazy about the violin obbligatos. He called the “Erbarme Dich” solo the most beautiful piece of music ever written for the violin. To me, the genius of the music’s pathos is that it isn’t the slightest bit manipulative (that minor-mode affliction so common in popular music.) Here, it’s about the sting of remorse. I find the humility and intimacy of the music almost overwhelming. Like a blues tune, it is a deeply personal statement, not a collective one. 
— From 'Erbarme dich' Tiny Revolution website by Bernard Chazelle, http://www.tinyrevolution.com/mt/archives/002903.html