Griselda

"Lloyd Banks Assists on Conway Campaign to Prove that He's the Grimiest, Ever" (AFH archive)

First published at Ambrosia for Heads, 29 September 2017, read the article on the AFH site

That highly distinctive deep-atmosphere, kept so twitchy and tense, that defines the Griselda Records sound is on full display in “Bullet Club” – the first single taken from Conway The Machine’s upcoming G.O.A.T.  The track sees him paired up with G-Unit MC Lloyd Banks and fellow Griselda affiliate Benny.

Produced by Griselda beat-maker Daringer, the track perfectly captures the menace we now associate with the Buffalo, New York crew.  “Ni**as know something, don’t play stupid…” the sample at the start begins, setting the scene for Conway’s more measured than usual verse, against the trademark hysterical laughter and simulated gunfire.

Conway addresses the listener, or to be more accurate, the competition directly, telling us he’s “dropped the hardest tapes since ’94.” And that even though his face might be “twisted,” no other rapper can “spit it the way [he] spit it.” At one point, Conway challenges us to come up with a name equal to his, even stopping for “a minute” – literally. This adds a humorous touch to his earlier riff on people getting stabbed in the face and all the other elements that typically make up his dark musical head-space.

Lloyd Banks, who with 50 Cent dominated the East Coast Gangsta Rap game through the 2000s is fully at ease here with this next generation kindred spirits, setting it up perfectly for Griselda stable-mate Benny to close, as he makes a strong showing.

According to Mass Appealwho premiered the songG.O.A.T. will feature involvement from Alchemist, 9th Wonder, Styles P, ScHoolboy Q, Anderson .Paak, Royce 5’9”, and Westside Gunn.

"DOOM & Westside Gunn are the Bad Guys on New Collabo" (AFH archive)

First published at Ambrosia for Heads, 27 September 2017, read the article on the AFH site

Few would expect that DOOM would be taking on the straight role as he does in this vaudevillian Rap High-Art wonder, “Gorilla Monsoon,” produced by Daringer and more than ably set up by the unhinged prevarications of Westside Gunn.

Ayo/Ayo” Westside Gunn repeats in his squeakiest voice ever, alluding to himself as if he were Dorothy, far, far, far away from Kansas. “Ayo, I was in my cell, I clicked my heels three times / P Just 2’s, my khaki suit mastermind / Water whip, tossed the coke in the alkaline … Immaculate rhyme (Immaculate rhyme) / It’s so obvious / Watchin’ the world from up top / Snakeskin binoculars.” It’s hard not to be impressed by an MC that rhymes “obvious” with “binoculars.”

Stoned immaculate, the Buffalo, New York little brother sounds quite strange here. His helium-maniacal delivery is buttressed by the pure creativity of the Daringer beat, drenched in a tacky ‘50s B-grade movie vibe, but it sounds like he’s spinning about lyrically – letting off sparks.

It’s funny too, as Westside Gunn enunciates his rhymes with such an earnest style that sounds pre-adolescent: this is not an insult. He spits with great enthusiasm: “My bedroom had a bedroom, my wrist be dancin’ / My bedroom had a bedroom, my wrist be dancin’ / The flyest that’s livin’, we live and die by the kitchen / Choppin’ on dishes, rack the puff in…

In comparison, DOOM’s verse comes across as relatively sedate and even seems to make some sense. Unlike Westside Gunn’s verse with all its trademark Griselda interruptions – all the “skrrrrrtttt” and “Pow-pow-pow-pow-pow-pow-pow” and “Drrrrr” and “Du-du-du-du-du-du-du-du…” – DOOM’s only has a subdued “yup” and “psst.”

DOOM seems to be taking on the older statesman role here, surveying the contemporary scene. His closing words are typically elegant, albeit with opaque references: “What’s revealed is of a certain feel – growth / Yellow moist mushy, banana peeled coke / At worst, could not be confused with real soap / Nope, you see disaster is intended / In the face of truth, don’t ever be offended….Overstand the past to get a grasp of the present (psst) / I make it faster than you spends it / End it.

What is particularly nice on “Gorilla Monsoon” is the way the musical mania is sustained by Daringer, in a way that supports the MCs’ imaginative flow. It never lets up, even while the drums are relatively relaxed and laidback.  Occasionally, there is a drum-roll, just for show almost, but it’s the wall of wavy sound that creates the highly cogent and distinctive mood that is almost beyond words.

"DOOM & Westside Gunn Sting with Bars on Alchemist Production" (AFH archive)

First published at Ambrosia for Heads, 11 October 2017, read the article on the AFH site

Everything is muted, quiet like a beautiful, twisted lullaby on “2Stings,” the most recent single from the forthcoming WestsideDOOM (DOOM and Gunn) collaboration, produced by another Shady family member, The Alchemist. “2Stings” has a very particular feel to it: at once spacey and under-stated, but also dense with effects.

Sustaining it all is one of the most subdued drum sounds in recent Hip-Hop music and a solitary, discordant note that doesn’t let up until the very end, further enhancing the claustrophobic mood.

DOOM once again takes on the calm uncle role here; his verse made up of “New York-style wow” includes his trademark smart wordplay; at one point, for example, coupling “Pasadena” with “grass is greener (Black Bimmer).”

When Westside Gunn bursts onto the song’s scene, at about one minute in, it’s in his typical popping-arteries style at play. Meanwhile, the Los Angeles producer maintains control and the beat goes on as before. “Life is great,” the Buffalo, New York native spits with enthusiasm. He soon adds: “If they kick down the door / Hit the Fire Escape … Wait.” As a bonus, “2Stings” is available as a free download too.

No release date has so far been given for the release of a WestsideDOOM project. But in September, Westside Gunn announced on social media: “WESTSIDEDOOM is here prod by ALCHEMIST & DARINGER this is one of the illest projects I’ve ever heard when u think ART, this is it the RAWEST, FLYEST, GRIMIEST sh*t you’ve ever heard IN YA LIFE wats dope than FLYGOD & DOOM  spread the gospel the day is soon cometh.” In August, DOOM released “DOOMSAYER” on an Alchemist track. That song was removed from Adult Swim’s jukebox following DOOM’s sudden ceasing of his Missing Notebook Rhyme series.

Compared to the pair’s most recent offering, last month’s excitable “Gorilla Monsoon” produced by Daringer, “2Stings” is a masterclass in the power of musical restraint.

‘All these rappers’ Ol’ Dirty Bastard (rare, date unknown) plus Nas/Beastie Boys – the hip-hop ‘scrappy aesthetic’, punk & Griselda

Before Wu-Tang became a global brand, known and beloved and worn as merchandise from one obscure part of the planet to the next, lauded on best-ever magazine lists, the Staten Island emcees offered a direct line with something much darker.

Listen in, for instance, to the rare outtakes and recordings, such as this one from Ol’ Dirty Bastard – date unknown (see also my earlier piece, from 2015, 'Super Rare Ol' Dirty Bastard Freestyle 1995 & hip-hop monstaz').

ODB today is often seen to be a kind of caricature, or vaudevillian joke act, but he’s always been my favourite out of the Wu-Tang crew because of his ability to convey tough logic and sentiment via off-the-wall humour, while representing a dark energy and freedom.

His voice, delivery and his flow is messy and hard to contain; it’s all over the place and wherever – and this makes it appealing.

ol-dirty-bastard__1.jpg

This rare recording, date unknown which seems to have been re-released in another version *with music* in 2001 conveys perfectly what I call the ‘scrappy aesthetic’ in hip-hop. If you wanted to, really wanted to, you could divide New York in the 90s into two streams – and much else besides, of course; on one side, there’s the cool formalism and control of DJ Premier, given voice by Rakim and then there are all these oddball mavericks, or voices from ‘the cellar’ like ODB and RZA, the Gravediggaz  … (and plenty more besides).

My personal bias/essential nature makes me gravitate towards the second group, as this kind of worldview makes me homesick for the punk music that shaped me as a kid and formed my musical education. But there is something about this that transcends the personal and conveys something essential about the genre; this idea that rap is a kind of music outside the norms, essentially and potentially disruptive and subversive.

What’s the use of all the technique if it gets fossilised into a kind of elegant pose, unable to be chipped away at, easily consumed as an artefact the world over like a McDonald’s hamburger?

Most of the times when rappers tackle politics it bores me stupid because it’s so explicit and there’s no interest in the music chugging along behind it. And yet I believe that these recordings are essentially political, not only because of the lyrical territory but the way they sound.

Just like punk they’re saying we’re not going to play the game, or meet your expectations; we’re not trying to please you.  

Made up from the scrap, speaking of the experience of the rejected, all this points to a kind of radical refusal in the music that rejects attempts to commodify it and sell it. Just on the basis of the sound alone it’s interesting because it actively, enthusiastically draws attention to its own messiness; it’s a kind 0f outsider art or ‘scrappy aesthetic’.

Bringing it up to the present now, there’s a direct point of continuum between this kind of thing and the Griselda artists -  that stable of emcees and producers – who I believe are producing the most interesting work in hip-hop today (will write more on them soon).

No longer is assessment of worth based wholly on the skill and versatility of the mc, their ability to express their thoughts with a high-level of language, or charm – see the Rakim paradigm – here it’s all about the capacity of the mc and producer to convey mood and give voice to those from the underground.

On the basis of language etc much of the lyrical content in this output doesn’t amount to much, but to talk like this is to miss the point spectacularly, I believe; just like the way critics of punk used to bang on about how the musicians could only play three chords, or what they produced sounded like unbridled noise.

Well, being ‘unschooled’ was the essential point – punk was a reaction against the ‘cleverness’ of all those boring musicians from the 70s who took themselves and their work so, so, so seriously.

What punk was encouraging was a re-assessment of music and performance, while asking questions about who had the right to perform and be heard; it was about refusing to ask for permission. It was about taking it, making space. Much the same could be said about this kind of thing in hip-hop past and present, this ‘scrappy aesthetic’.

All this is music from the offcuts, music and voice from long-forgotten, maybe, radio shows; the hiss and scratching of it all. No need to be so clean and considered and tasteful, much better to keep it raw, uncooked.

For the bubble-gum version, but still nice:

Coda:

RZA & Ol Dirty Bastard - Freestyle (Rare / Unreleased) 

In praise of: Bullet ep, Conway the Machine, prod. Mil (Effiscienz, 2016)

Start with the voice, then.

Often non-Black, or more accurately journalists from the middle-class (ie the vast majority of writers writing on the genre it often seems to me, and yep I'm included in this bracket) writing on rap/hip-hop, get themselves twisted up in knots when faced with an MC taking on the voice of the criminal. Or 'gangsta until the day I got to go’ ...

They quote lyrics that sound strange out of context, wonder about authenticity and the lived experience and sometimes worry about the artist's negative influence. 

Let's skip all that here, though, as it's the voice of Conway that makes this ep - alongside the restrained production, offered up by Mil (the Paris/Brussels-based engineer, Miloud Sassi). What matters is not only what Conway says, but how he says it. Conway’s delivery sounds straight, so unaffected. And this simplicity makes this release different from so many others, operating within the same trajectory.

It’s almost as if the music operates like a surface; you can choose how you relate to it because the elements, the raw material are allowed to breathe.

The first track that I came across, 'Just Gangsta (No Mercy version) ... 

Slowed down, starting with what seems to be the fall-back inclusion of the static that has come to represent the past, the snap-crackle-and pop of the ‘vinyl effect’ (listening to it now, I can't hear this, maybe I'm starting to imagine things) and the epic Nosferatu-Quasimodo bells, slotting in perfectly with the very nice beat. The record label's promo material refers to Mil as having a touch that is 'clinical' - makes sense here. 

Of course, the gangster stance is an essential part of the story-telling tradition that animates hip-hop. But rather than all those Blaxploitation echoes you find everywhere, where the gangster is some kind of exaggerated buffoon, or wearing some kind of mask, Conway's delivery is unadorned; unschooled (the kind of patter you might hear at a bus-stop maybe).

Note how the first 'Just gangsta' is really different, much more cinematic as they say. You can hear the Bullet ep on Bandcamp. 

Slight diversion: below the YT video you can find one of the funniest and sweetest exchanges to be found on any hip-hop video ...

KURUPT KALHOON2 months ago

i can only listen to conway and westside gunn nowadays. problem is i am white and german, so i turn it down at the traffic light

            Alexander Hyacinthe2 months ago

It's not about what you are ethnically, it's about what you want to hear. These guys are all I bump and I'm from the suburbs, but the production is on point, the vibe is straight gutter 90s, and the feeling is immaculate. I love it all!

Farrukh R2 months ago

don't be so insecure bro. let that music be heard.. turn that shit up! the only ones getting mad are mostly fuckboys and old ass people. you good...