Reggae

"Which way you going natty" Hortense Ellis & Clint Eastwood (Top Ranking 12", date?) plus J.Holt

This song is irresistible: especially when Clint Eastwood comes in to spin his particular brand of magic, over the dulcet gentleness of Ellis singing of the munificence of Jah (“Which way are you going Natty?” - Not sure! - “Can I come too?” - Right you are!)

From the Discogs release info:

“On the a side there is a typo as we see a H at the end of the name of Hortense Ellis 
On B side there might be another typo as instead of Freddy we have Dreddy.. the labels talk by themselves 

The catalogue might be TC 002 if the runout talks the truth.”

John Holt’s smooth charmer persona is in overdrive in his version of the song, “Which way you going, Baby” released on his 10,000 Volts of Holt album that came out in 1973 on Trojan.

Under the big-band excess, with strings, is a really nice bassline.

“Natty Don’t Go” Cornel/l Campbell, prod. Coxsone Dodd (Studio One 7”, 1975) & more

Without wanting to fall into a journalistic tic of once again selling this track as so distinctive, so different etc (a tic I can’t kick even if I felt so inclined) this song stands out among other reggae songs, as it does within Campbell’s oeuvre for the expressive quality of his voice.

Campbell is well-known for the sweetness of his singing, with some suggesting he is the greatest among his contemporaries, many of whom similarly sang in a soft style. On this track there is something so exposed, so plaintive it’s closer to the delivery of a Soul singer it seems to me. This impression comes from the song’s dramatic opening and then reinforced by the way he sings certain words, adding a syllable almost (“dread” and “yeah”), thereby making the words sound fragile. It’s almost as if you can hear his breath within them. Note too the way his voice is at the very start, of everything. The song begins with his voice, as I wrote about the other C.S. “Coxsone” Dodd production for Carlton and the Shoes, starting a song with the singer enmeshed in the music is atypical in terms of most songs that came out of Jamaica at that time. Most often the band would begin for the singer to come in later.

The music by the Brentford Rockers provides the perfect foundations: the highly sibilant drums, the bass line deep in the mix, before the guitars come in changing the mood, allowing for an upbeat feel. Even Campbell’s vocals become jaunty one minute in, moving away from the previously introspective nature of it.

Natty Dread, don’t go into Babylon, oh no, no, no
It will be dread, dread, dread, dread
Remember our days, of slavery,
Our people sold out, to Babylon
How they tried to trick us out of our land,
But Natty Dreads, don’t go, back to Babylon
Natty don’t go
Remember the pain and the suffering,
Jah Jah children bear in Babylon
How they try, to take Jah power plans
So Natty Dreads don’t go, back to Babylon
Natty don’t go
It will be dread
It shall be dread..
Natty Dread, Natty Dread, Natty Dread, Natty don’t go
I beg you Natty Dread, Natty Dread, Natty Dread, Natty don’t go
And dreads so was sold out for thirteen pieces of silver
Martin Luther King also, he was a blessed man, yeh
Remember poor Marcus, poor Marcus Garvey, when was a home predictor
Brother Paul Bogle, he fight so hard to save his life, yeh-yeh
So I beg you Dread, Natty Dreads, Natty Dreads, Natty don’t go
So I beg you Dread, Natty Dreads, Natty Dreads, Natty don’t go
Remember our days, of slavery,
Our people sold out, to Babylon
How they tried to trick us out of our land,
But Natty Dreads, don’t go, back to Babylon
Natty don’t go
It will be dread
It shall be dread..
Natty Dread, Natty Dread, Natty Dread, Natty don’t go
I beg you Dread, Natty Dread, Natty Dread, Natty Dread, Natty don’t go
And dreads so was sold out for thirteen pieces of silver, yeh-yeh
So I beg you Dread, Natty Dreads, Natty Dreads, Natty don’t go
Natty Dread, Natty Dread, Natty Dread, Natty don’t go

Here’s the extremely simple, even basic dub version that came out under the name “Natty Rub A Dub” on the b-side (as Campbell and the Brentford Rockers, elsewhere they recorded under the name Brentford All Stars) - and another version, which is just-about music only. Check out this other version, which sounds like an entirely different recording, much sharper and with a bouncy, almost Flamenco-style guitar.

Compare the song with this similarly stunning Campbell-penned song featuring Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare from 1985. No better pick-you-up, burst of optimism and faith than this music and then the final section is one more example of how superb the musicianship of artists from that era was, generally.

Here on this song the mood is completely different from the poetic excursions in the track from one decade earlier. From Jo-Ann Greene’s (typically) good AllMusic review:

“Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare provide the steaming rhythm, Roy Cousins the excellent production, and Cornell Campbell the superb vocals for this rousing and inspirational number from 1985.

Ragga was about to engulf the reggae world, but "Jah Jah Give Us Love" was one final, brilliant reminder of the cultural age it was about to bury. Like a shooting star, the riddim rockets across the grooves, its core Dunbar's solid beats and Shakespeare's fast padding bass line. Trailing in their incendiary wake is the sharp rhythm guitar, glorious keyboards, ebullient organ, and the haunting lead guitar flourishes so beloved in the roots age.

Campbell is almost physically propelled along this magnificent riddim, giving way to its propulsive power, and giving himself over to Jah. Part prayer, part affirmation, the singer reaches an epiphany, delivering up one of his best performances to date along the way. "Love" couldn't hold back the tidal way of DJs and synthesized sounds breaking over the island, but with this song pure roots rockers blinked out in a blaze of glory.”

Coda: